United Methodist Women Making History

Translate Page

In 1987, the U.S. Congress designated the month of March as Women's History Month. United Methodist News Service invited a number of women, both lay and clergy, in The United Methodist Church to share their stories.

Featured Stories

Related Stories

Resources


Like what you're reading? Support the ministry of UM News! Your support ensures the latest denominational news, dynamic stories and informative articles will continue to connect our global community. Make a tax-deductible donation at ResourceUMC.org/GiveUMCom.

Sign up for our newsletter!

UMNEWS-SUBSCRIPTION
Faith Stories
Rep. Delia Ramírez Hernández (D-Ill.) was elected Nov. 8, 2022, to serve in the 118th U.S. Congress as its first United Methodist Latino woman. Her husband, Boris Hernández, supports Ramírez Hernández in her political career and in the service that she provides to the communities that she represents. Photo courtesy of Delia Ramirez.

First United Methodist Latina sworn into US Congress

Rep. Delia Ramírez Hernández (D-Ill.) was sworn into the 118th U.S. Congress on Jan. 7. She grew up attending Humboldt Park United Methodist Church in Chicago and has been a leader in the denomination.
Church History
Abolitionists worked to end slavery in the 19th century in the Americas and Western Europe. A new book by the Rev. James Richardson, “The Abolitionist’s Journal,” chronicles his great-great-grandfather’s work as a Methodist clergyman and antislavery advocate. Shown here is the official medallion of the British Anti-Slavery Society, produced as a jasper-ware cameo by Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795) at the Wedgewood factory. Image courtesy of the British Anti-Slavery Society, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A generational passion for justice

A book by an Episcopal priest explores the life of his great-great-grandfather, a Methodist clergyman and abolitionist.
Church History
Image by Larisa Koshkina, courtesy of Pixabay; graphic by Laurens Glass, UM News

The intriguing history of ‘O Holy Night’

The 300-year-old story of a beloved Christmas song is filled with scandal, politics and dubiousness. Yet the 19th-century French carol remains a favorite. Chrystal Caviness reports for UMC.org.