Ask The UMC

Church History
Image of a circuit rider, courtesy of the General Commission on Archives and History for The United Methodist Church, Drew University.

Ask The UMC: Why do United Methodist pastors change churches?

The United Methodist Church’s unique system of deploying clergy has its roots in the earliest days of Methodism.
Racism
The Revs. Pauline Kang and Motoe Foor lead Holy Communion during opening worship at the 2018 Ohana Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii. The conference was held by the Association of Asian American and Pacific Islander Clergywomen (AAPIC) and the National Association of Korean American United Methodist Clergywomen (NAKAUMC). Photo by Thomas Kim, UM News.

Ask The UMC: How can United Methodists address racism against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders?

Asian and Pacific Islanders in the United States have continued to face racism from governmental actions and white supremacy since at least the middle of the 19th century. United Methodists are called in baptism to resist these and all forms of evil, injustice, and oppression.
Church History
The Rev. Zenro Hirota (second row from the top, third from the left) poses with other attendees of the 10th Annual Session of the Pacific Japanese Mission of the Methodist Episcopal Church held in Seattle, Wash., in 1909. Hirota is listed as “pastor at San Francisco” on the original legend. Image courtesy of Archives and History of the California-Pacific Conference; graphic by Laurens Glass, United Methodist Communications.

Ask The UMC: Pioneers in Methodism - Zenro Hirota

Rev. Zenro Hirota was a pioneer among Japanese American Methodists, serving for 45 years, often facing great difficulties, alongside his colleagues in the California Conference in a variety of settings (mission, local church, school, publishing, mission society leadership).
Church History
William Apess was the first Native American licensed to preach by American Methodists. Photo from "A Son of the Forest. The Experience of Will Apes (sic), A Native of the Forest," courtesy of Internet Archive; graphic by Laurens Glass, United Methodist Communications.

Ask The UMC: Pioneers in Methodism — William Apess

William Apess was the first Native American licensed to preach among American Methodists and the leading advocate for Native American rights in the first half of the 19th century.

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