Seeing a Way Forward: The Rev. Tom Lambrecht

The Rev. Thomas Lambrecht addresses the Wesleyan Covenant Association at its April 28-29, 2017, meeting at Christ United Methodist Church in Memphis, Tennessee. Lambrecht, a member of the association’s leadership council and vice president of the Good News renewal group, served as emcee for the gathering. Photo by Tim Tanton, UMNS.
The Rev. Thomas Lambrecht addresses the Wesleyan Covenant Association at its April 28-29, 2017, meeting in Memphis, Tennessee. File photo by Tim Tanton, UMNS.

The Rev. Tom Lambrecht, vice president and general manager of Good News and a member of the Wesleyan Covenant Association leadership council, helped craft the legislation that became the Traditional Plan and the Modified Traditional Plan that have been submitted to the 2019 General Conference.

Lambrecht spoke with UM News as part of “Seeing a Way Forward,” a video series featuring different perspectives of church leaders on the work of the Commission on a Way Forward.

Watch videos.


Way Forward member discusses Traditional Plan creation
The Rev. Tom Lambrecht talks about how the Traditional Plan was almost dropped from the plans to be considered by the Council of Bishops.

“Gracious exit is essential.”
The Rev. Tom Lambrecht says the Traditional Plan is the only petition that offers a way for those in disagreement to exit the church, which he feels is necessary at this crossroads in The United Methodist Church.

Expect chaos if General Conference doesn’t select a plan
With the special called 2019 General Conference looming, the Rev. Tom Lambrecht warns that if delegates fail to select one of the plans before them, “we are setting the church up for chaos and splintering.”

Traditional Plan crafter considers positives, negatives of other plans
The Rev. Tom Lambrecht said there is much to like about the Connectional Conference Plan, but that there is “nothing in the One Church Plan that I could support.”

“It’s not possible for us to be in one denomination together.”
The Rev. Tom Lambrecht says it’s important for others to know that evangelicals do not wish them ill will, but they believe it’s no longer possible for such opposing theological viewpoints to co-exist within the same denomination.

This is the tenth in a series of video interviews by United Methodist News Service. View all the interviews.

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
Social Concerns
Teenager Melody Rudairo Nyamadzi, a junior Parliament representative and a member of the United Methodist Youth Fellowship, urges children to let their voices be heard during a special service led by the children’s ministry at St. Dorcas United Methodist Church in Harare, Zimbabwe. Photo by the Rev. Taurai Emmanuel Maforo, UM News.

Young United Methodist advocates for abused children

Junior parliamentarian urges Zimbabwe church to listen to children and advocate for their protection.
General Church
Eight bishops sign statement calling for “vibrant and missionally effective Wesleyan movement.” Graphic by Laurens Glass, UM News.

Group of bishops calling for ‘deeper conversations’

Eight active and retired United Methodist bishops released a statement calling for the church to be open to new expressions of Methodist witness.
General Church
Bishop Michael McKee speaks during the United Methodist Council of Bishops meeting in Lake Junaluska, N.C., where the bishops learned that, at the current rate of giving, the bishops will run out of funds in 2024. McKee is president of the denomination’s General Council on Finance and Administration. With him at the podium is Bishop Minerva Carcaño. Photo by Sam Hodges, UM News.

Bishops warned their funding imperiled

Church financial leaders sounded the alarm that if current trends persist, the Episcopal Fund will run out of money in five years.