Oklahoma Tornado: Moore FUMC checking on its members

MOORE, Okla. (UMNS)—The Rev. Tish Malloy, pastor of First United Methodist Church, said the last two days have been “pretty painful” as residents of a town blown apart by a tornado on May 20 start to pick up the pieces.

First United Methodist was not damaged but was without water and electricity until last night, she said. People are just being let into some of the most damaged neighborhoods today. Malloy is busy trying to reach the members of her church and make sure everyone is taken care of and has a place to stay. So far, she said she has heard 12 members lost their homes.

Malloy said social media has made a dramatic difference from this tornado and the one that struck Moore in May 1999.

“We have had communications from United Methodists all over the world telling us they are praying for us. It means so much to us.”

How disaster giving works

When both the United Methodist Committee on Relief and an annual conference ask for funds, United Methodists who want to help in a disaster might be uncertain where to send donations.

Conferences may set up their own funds to help with the immediate needs of housing, food, shelter and transportation. Conference fundraising is intended for raising money within the conference to meet immediate needs.

Giving to UMCOR through The Advance, the United Methodist official giving channel, ensures that 100 hundred percent of each donation goes directly to the need specified. UMCOR’s administrative costs are covered through a separate fund supported by One Great Hour of Sharing.

Read more about how disaster giving works.

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