Online Worship

Church Growth
Churches may have shuttered their doors during the COVID-19 pandemic, but disciple-making kept going through digital ministries. In observance of Social Media Day, UM News explores how churches are reaching new people through social media and online offerings. Globe by OpenClipart-Vectors, courtesy of Pixabay; graphic by Laurens Glass, UM News.

Social media takes disciple-making global

Even as the pandemic forced churches to close their buildings, social media opened new doors for United Methodists to make disciples across continents.
Worship
Chase Crickenberger. Photo courtesy of the author. Mr. Crickenberger's commentary appears in the Blogs and Commentaries section of Untied Methodist News.

Online communion should not be here to stay

The church would risk further marginalizing shut-ins and others by denying them a physical experience of the Body of Christ.
Mission and Ministry
The Rev. Amy Wilson Feltz, pastor of St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in El Paso, Texas, sets up computer equipment to stream a live sermon in the church’s sanctuary in September. Although the pulpit, which is visible on-camera, has the appropriate liturgical color, the banner on the wall was from Lent, when the church had to suspend in-person worship. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Amy Wilson Feltz.

Virtual worship is here for good

If there’s a positive side to the coronavirus for churches, it’s that many of them have dramatically upped their game online.
General Church
Mark Doyal. Photo courtesy of the Michigan Conference.

Churches must adapt to historic disruption

Amid the upheavals of 2020, churches have an opportunity to embody God’s Kingdom in new ways.

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