Year 1: Sandy recovery — Mission teams needed

By Linda Bloom*

The continuing influx of volunteer teams is a critical component of United Methodist Sandy recovery efforts.

Lisa Park, volunteer coordinator for Greater New Jersey’s A Future with Hope, said she already is connecting with teams that previously visited and with volunteer in mission coordinators of the denomination’s five jurisdictions and anyone else showing an interest in helping. “We’re putting it out in all different avenues getting ready for the spring and summer,” she noted. “On our June calendar, we have at least one team a week scheduled already.”

The Rev. Tom Vencuss, Sandy disaster coordinator for the New York Annual Conference, also is looking at offering the option of working for a day, week or weekend or assisting with “bite-sized pieces” of house projects.

“One of the challenges is going to be keeping the Sandy need in front of people,” he said. “This recovery is going to be multiple years.”

Coordinating the work with other partners at the unmet needs roundtable also is essential. “In the relief phases, things are pretty straightforward,” Vencuss explained. “The recovery is much more of a challenge. You’ve got local regulations, you’ve got permits that have to be pulled.

“The sequencing of efforts, the coordination of that is critical.”

Case managers also are important in building relationships with Sandy survivors, said New Jersey Area Bishop John Schol.

“We can only help those in need if we understand the complexity of their issues and have the resources available to help them navigate through the complicated task of recovery,” he added.

This fall, the Greater New Jersey Conference has set far-reaching funding targets withA Future with Hope Mission Fund campaign. The goal is to raise $12 million — $7 million for Sandy recovery, $2 million for Imagine No Malaria and $3 million for local church mission projects —over the next three years. “Seventy percent of our clergy have already made a commitment to our campaign personally,” the bishop noted.

Come to Brooklyn!

A former home for unwed mothers, established when German Methodists settled in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, now provides simple accommodations for Sandy volunteer teams.

Up to 50 volunteers have access to rooms on the top two floors, each of which has two full baths and a half bath, as well as kitchen facilities and a roof deck barbecue overlooking the leafy backyard. Street parking is available at the building, which houses a day center for seniors, and a grocery is nearby.

Additional volunteer housing is being considered, said the Rev. Wesley Daniels and Gillian Prince, organizers of the Brooklyn work for the New York Annual Conference.

“The biggest challenge is how quickly this storm dropped off the radar,” said Caleb Keane, a construction manager with Resurrection Brooklyn, who has appreciated the contributions of United Methodist teams. “We were hoping to have a bigger response.”

* Bloom is a United Methodist News Service multimedia reporter based in New York. Follow her at http://twitter.com/umcscribe. Contact her at (646) 369-3759 or[email protected].

Hurricane Sandy

Fall 2012

Winter 2013

Spring 2013

Summer 2013

Fall 2013

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
Mission and Ministry
A Coast Guard Sector Ohio Valley Shallow Water Response Team rescues nine people and one dog Sept. 16, 2020, near Navarre Beach, Fla., after they were stranded by Hurricane Sally. U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Sector Ohio Valley Shallow Water Response Team.

Churches pick up after Sally

Hurricane brought strong winds, torrential rain to west Florida and south Alabama.
Racism
The Rev. David Maldonado. Video image courtesy of IMU Latina (Iglesia Metodista Unida Latina) via YouTube by UM News.

Racism and Latinos: The wall of separation and fear

The U.S.-Mexico border wall speaks volumes about attitudes toward Latinos, and the church must do more to respond.
Mission and Ministry
Wildfires burn during a mid-August night near Susanville, Calif. A series of wildfires has destroyed more than 30,000 acres of land around Susanville. Photo by Doug Magill, U.S. Army.

Fires, coronavirus complicate Western disaster relief

After a hurricane or tornado, church disaster relief teams and volunteers typically spring into action. Such a response isn’t possible in wildfires.