United Methodist Women prayer and quilting station

Roberta Lau talks about the prayer and quilting station. She says that many people from many nations have stopped by the meditative space. Some take the opportunity to talk with God as they draw on fabric squares that will become parts of a quilt. Others anoint themselves with oil from shells from New Zealand and experience some quiet time in the prayer corner.

The experience, she says, is “more than we ever imagined! There are some amazing expressions on the fabrics.”

The squares will be sewn into 5 quilts. One will be on display at each of the five jurisdictional Schools of Christian Mission.

The United Methodist prayer and quilting station is also a distribution point for the small, round buttons that are so popular. “The words on the buttons are expressions of how United Methodist Women represent themselves…loving, caring, courageous, awesome, bold, awesome, faithful, daring…”

Click here to see a photo gallery of the UMW quilt squares, supplies, and anointing oil shells

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