United Methodist University acting president is dead

The Rev. Dr. James D. Karblee, acting president at United Methodist University, died suddenly on Oct. 29. He was 71.

ELWA Hospital officials certified that Karblee did not die of Ebola.

Karblee, who was vice president for administration at the university, was at work on Oct. 29 and left without showing any sign of illness, according to his assistant Jacob P. Young.

“He was a hypertension person and would intermittently complain about gastro-indigestion problems,” Young said.

Family members said they took Karblee to the hospital after he became weak and unresponsive.

Karblee joined the United Methodist University in 2004 after serving The United Methodist Church in Liberia as director of Connectional Ministries, district superintendent, pastor, chairperson of several boards including Connectional Ministries and Board of Ordained Ministry. 

Julu Swen, a communicator for The United Methodist Church in Liberia, provided this story.

News media contact: Vicki Brown, news editor, [email protected] or 615-742-5469.


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