UE Offers Free Tuition for College Students Displaced by Hurricane

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The University of Evansville today announced that it is now offering free tuition for this semester to any college student who has paid tuition and was enrolled at one of the colleges now devastated by Hurricane Katrina. UE President Stephen Jennings says making this offer is the “right thing to do. We want to give them a home for the semester.”

Jennings explained that students will be allowed to take courses where open seats remain in UE classes and continue their college studies this semester, so that they will not get too far behind in their college schedules. Tom Bear, vice president of enrollment services stressed that “time is of the essence. Classes at UE began Aug. 24, so for the students’ own academic success they would need to be enrolled and in classes by Wednesday, Sept. 7.” The only costs the student would be required to pay would be for fees and books.

UE fees are $270 per semester and include the health and wellness fee, technology fee and the student activity fee. Book costs vary widely based upon courses taken. If students wish to live on campus, they must carry at least 12-credit hours. Room and board fees would be applicable if this option is selected. For more information or to register for classes, please contact Bonnie Daly, assistant director of the Center for Continuing Education, 812-488-2767.

The University of Evansville is a private, United Methodist Church-related, comprehensive university that is a member of the Associated New American Colleges. UE celebrates more than 150 years of civic mission and sacred trust, providing life transforming educational experiences that prepare students to engage the world as informed, ethical and productive citizens.

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