African-Americans contributing to the Church

African-Americans are a vital part of the tapestry of The United Methodist Church. They have played important roles in the development of the denomination in the United States since 1758.

A service of appreciation at the 2004 General Conference celebrated African-American contributions, witness, and presence within the denomination and recognized “those who stayed” in spite of racism.

Today Black Methodists for Church Renewal represents more than 2,400 black United Methodist congregations and approximately 500,000 African-American members in the United States.

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Mission and Ministry
Bishop LaTrelle Easterling leads a report on the 2019 General Conference during the Black Methodists for Church Renewal meeting in Atlanta. Easterling raised a concern about LGBTQ African Americans in the church, calling them “the marginalized of the marginalized.” Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS.

Bishops discuss GC2019 outcomes with black caucus

African American bishops and members of the church’s black caucus consider the actions of General Conference 2019.
Church Growth
Bishop Cynthia Moore-Koikoi urges members and guests of Black Methodists for Church Renewal to "stay woke" during her sermon at Ben Hill United Methodist Church in Atlanta. "Stay woke" is a call to be aware of racial and social justice issues and is closely associated with the Black Lives Matter movement.

BMCR explores ‘reset’ from past to future

Speakers challenge The United Methodist Church’s African American caucus and church leaders to work to become more relevant to younger members.
Mission and Ministry
Vibrant worship was a key part of the celebration of 200 years of Methodist mission, sponsored by the United Methodist Board of Global Ministries and Emory University’s Candler School of Theology, which drew some 250 participants to Atlanta. Photo by Jennifer Silver, Global Ministries.

200 years of answering the call to mission

From a salute to a pioneer among the Wyandotte to a call to engage global youth, a United Methodist event re-considers the nature of mission.