Slideshow: A look at local pastors

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For the United Methodist News Service series “Trending Local,” about the growing importance of licensed local pastors in The United Methodist Church, photographer Mike DuBose traveled around West Virginia and Kentucky — two states with lots of local pastors. He captured images of them in their church settings. For some who are bivocational, he also photographed them at their secular jobs. The slideshow includes examples of lovely rural United Methodist churches encountered along the way.

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