Plan UMC Representation as Amended

During the debate on the Plan UMC proposal, an amendment was offered to increase representation on the general boards and agencies from the Central Conferences. The amendment, which was the only amendment adopted on the plan, created some confusion among delegates in trying to make sense of the new representation on boards and agencies.

Through an analysis of the Plan UMC legislation and the amendment offered today, we have created a chart outlining the percentage of representatation by category and jurisdiction. These numbers are not official, but represent our best estimate based on our reading of the approved legislation.

This chart represents the aggregate representation of all the general boards and agencies, with the exception of the new United Methodist Women organization, which was not included in the plan nor the amendment. The “other” category includes at-large members, as well as a number of positions unique to specific agencies (the jurisdictional presidents of United Methodist Men, for example).

The breakdown of committee membership numbers, according to our analysis of the data can be found via the link below.

representation.pdf


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