Oklahoma Tornado: OKC University reaches out to those affected

OKLAHOMA CITY (UMNS)—About 20 students and faculty at United Methodist-related Oklahoma City University were affected by the May 20 tornado, including the death of a daughter of one of the university’s “house moms,” said Sandy Pantlik, director of communications.

Mary Brewer, who lives and takes care of students in one of the university’s dorms, lost her 49-year-old daughter, who was in a store that collapsed during the storm.

Pantlik said the university was coordinating efforts to reach out to Oklahoma City Community College as well as the United Methodist churches in the area. Oklahoma City University will be the site of the 2013 Oklahoma United Methodist Annual (regional) Conference, set to begin May 27.

The university is also opening its dorms to any students affected by the storm. The university’s food service company is providing food for first responders.

How disaster giving works

When both the United Methodist Committee on Relief and an annual conference ask for funds, United Methodists who want to help in a disaster might be uncertain where to send donations.

Conferences may set up their own funds to help with the immediate needs of housing, food, shelter and transportation. Conference fundraising is intended for raising money within the conference to meet immediate needs.

Giving to UMCOR through The Advance, the United Methodist official giving channel, ensures that 100 hundred percent of each donation goes directly to the need specified. UMCOR’s administrative costs are covered through a separate fund supported by One Great Hour of Sharing.

Read more about how disaster giving works.


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