Liberian bishop visits schools reopened after Ebola

The bishop of The United Methodist Church in Liberia urged students to take learning seriously because the church and the country are depending on them as future leaders.

Bishop John G. Innis, in preparation for the 189th Session of the Liberia Conference, has been visiting various church programs and constituencies, including schools.

Due to the Ebola epidemic, Liberia’s schools were closed from last July until recent weeks.

“God through Jesus Christ has something good in store for you," Innis told students at Siaffa-keh United Methodist School in Grand Cape Mount County.

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Students pose with Bishop John G. Innis during his visit to Siaffa-keh United Methodist School.  The school was built by the First United Methodist Church in Monrovia and serves 310 students.  Photo by Julu Swen.

Innis urged the students to be respectful to each other, to their teachers, principal and to those “who help to prepare your lunch every day.”

“When you do these things, Jesus will be happy with you always and will double his love for you,” Innis said.

The bishop thanked the Revs. Ellen Thompson and Julius Williams for their leadership at the First United Methodist Church in Monrovia. The school was constructed by the First United Methodist Church in Monrovia as part of its ministry to the people of Liberia. It opened in 2010 and now 310 students.

"Your leadership at First United Methodist Church is in response to the mission of our church of making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world,” Innis said.

The Rev. Milton Dunbar, principal of the Siaffa-keh  school, thanked Innis for his visit.

“The staff and students are extremely happy and your visit here today is an assurance that we are a part of the United Methodist Church Liberia school system,” the principal said. “Indeed your presence on our campus despite your busy schedule is an indication that you love and care for us dearly.”

The school is one of 56 United Methodist schools in Liberia.

*Swen is editor and publisher of West African Writers, an online publication about United Methodist happenings in West Africa and assists the denomination in Liberia with coverage for United Methodist Communications.

News media contact: Vicki Brown, [email protected] or 615-742-5469.

 


 

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