Ganta hospital administrator steps down

Victor Doolakeh Taryor, a United Methodist missionary, has left Ganta United Methodist Hospital after eight years as its administrator. He is planning to serve as a consultant.

During his tenure as administrator, he oversaw the hospital’s response to health problems rarely seen in the United States. These problems included fistula, often endured by women who have been raped multiple times, and the worst Ebola outbreak in history.

“UMC Ganta hospital is well prepared to respond to any Ebola outbreak more than we were when the Ebola virus first hit Liberia,” said Taryor, who is also co-chairperson of the Nimba County Ebola Task Force.

He joined the hospital’s staff in 1986 as a student. He rose through the ranks, holding the position of shift supervisor and later director of nursing services before becoming administrator.

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Victor Doolakeh Taryor chats with Nora Keah, who will serve as interim administrator at Ganta United Methodist Hospital after Taryor’s departure. Photo by Julu Swen, UMNS.

In 2008, the United Methodist Board of Global Ministries commissioned Taryor as a missionary in its Global Health Missionary Program.

“Community service has always been my passion,” he told a gathering of Ganta Hospital staff and other United Methodists.

During the sending off service at Miller McAllister United Methodist Church, the Rev. James Z. Labala described Taryor as a faithful servant of the church. Labala, the former pastor on the church, is now superintendent of the Gompa district.

“Your faithfulness in doing small jobs will lead to greater responsibilities,” the pastor told Taryor.

The Rev. Samuel Quire, assistant to Liberia Area Bishop John Innis, credited Taryor with establishing a good working relationship between Ganta hospital and the nation’s Ministry of Health.

Nora Keah is now serving as interim administrator of the hospital until the United Methodist Church in Liberia can recruit a new administrator.

*Swen is editor and publisher of West African Writers, an online publication about United Methodist happenings in West Africa and assists the denomination in Liberia with coverage for United Methodist Communications.

News media contact: Vicki Brown, [email protected] or 615-742-5469.


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