Free GCSRW webinar series begins Feb. 4

A series of webinars aimed at helping develop principled leaders in The United Methodist Church is being offered this year by the General Commission on the Status and Role of Women.

“These webinars all offer skills for Christian leadership at the local, regional and connectional level,” said Audrey J. Krumbach, the agency’s director of gender justice and education.

The first online seminar, offered at 7:30 p.m. (EST) Feb. 4, is a primer on Robert’s Rules of Order, the parliamentary procedure used at Annual and General Conference legislative sessions. Krumbach said familiarity with Robert’s Rules helps potential lay or clergy leaders participate in annual conference legislative discussions, understand the way large groups make complex decisions, and strengthen their leadership skills.

Other webinar topics include creating talent banks, how to perform monitoring reports, how to write and submit petitions, and ways to advocate for women.

The Book of Discipline calls for GCSRW “to challenge The United Methodist Church . . . to a continuing commitment to the full and equal responsibility and participation of women in the total life and mission of the Church.” The webinars are suitable for all United Methodists – not just those affiliated with GCSRW – who are interested in developing themselves or others as leaders in the church and the world, Krumbach said.

She suggests gathering groups – annual conference COSROW members, church councils, or any other potential church or conference leaders – to participate in the webinars together from a home or church setting. Groups can discuss concepts, share questions and answers, and complete the interactive activities together. For ideas or information about hosting a webinar-participation session, email Audrey at akrumbach@gcsrw.org.

Mark your calendars for the 2014 schedule of online GCSRW training sessions. All webinars will begin at 7:30 pm (Eastern time) and will last for 90 minutes. To register, simply email Audrey. To learn more about the technology and ensure your computer is ready, click here:Webinar_Attendee_QuickRef_Guide-3

If you cannot attend, webinars will be archived as videos atGCSRW.org

The schedule:

Feb. 4 – Robert’s Rules 101: Learning to Participate in Conference Legislative Sessions

April 1 — Monitoring Reports: Increasing Participation through Gentle, Mutual Accountability

May 13 — Binders Full of Women: How to Create, Maintain and Utilize a Talent Bank

Sept. 9 — AC COSROW 101: How to Get Started with Advocacy, Education and Monitoring

Oct. 7 — Legislation:How to Write and Submit Petitions for Annual or General Conferences

Nov. 18 — Expansive Language for God: Biblical Names You Never Learned in Sunday School

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