Conversation with Bishop William Boyd Grove

Bishop William Boyd Grove has been a busy man since January. He’s the resident bishop for the West Virginia Annual Conference, a role he stepped into after Bishop Earnest S. Lyght retired on December 31, 2011. This week at General Conference, he’s also sitting in several plenary sessions as an “advising” bishop. He explains that role in this audio clip, and talks about the motion to refer Plan UMC that just failed in morning plenary.


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Judicial Council
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