Churchwomen put smiles on patients' faces

Translate Page
Ratidzai Mukono (left), treasurer of United Methodist Women in Maun, Botswana, and Tsitsi Mabambe, Maun Mission Women chair, receive a certificate of appreciation recognizing the ministry’s contributions. United Methodist Women in Maun celebrated Women’s Month by donating food and toiletries worth $500 U.S. to female patients at Letsholathebe Memorial Hospital, a district facility in Botswana. Photo by Priscilla Muzerengwa, UM News. 
Ratidzai Mukono (left), treasurer of United Methodist Women in Maun, Botswana, and Tsitsi Mabambe, Maun Mission Women chair, receive a certificate of appreciation recognizing the ministry’s contributions. United Methodist Women in Maun celebrated Women’s Month by donating food and toiletries worth $500 U.S. to female patients at Letsholathebe Memorial Hospital, a district facility in Botswana. Photo by Priscilla Muzerengwa, UM News.

Key Points:

  • United Methodist donations of food and toiletries enrich lives at Letsholathebe Memorial Hospital in Maun, Botswana.
  • The United Methodist women’s ministry in Maun celebrated Women’s Month with their gift, valued at $500 U.S.
  • The women’s goals are to share Christ’s love and make him known through evangelism, visitation and assistance for the less privileged of the community, including the orphans and widows.

United Methodist Women in Maun recently celebrated Women’s Month by donating food and toiletries worth $500 U.S. to female patients at Letsholathebe Memorial Hospital, a district facility in Botswana.

Tsisti Mabambe, United Methodist Women chair, and a team of representatives presented the items on behalf of the women’s ministry. Donations were sourced from members, friends, associates and church families.

Monica Mberi, a nurse, explained that the women brought sanitary pads, which are not available at the hospital; toiletries for patients who are admitted unexpectedly; and fruits and drinks for the patients.    

“Each patient received a fruit hamper and toiletries,” Mberi said. “The Mazoe drinks were given to nurses so they would dilute [them] for patients and give them during mealtimes.” 

Tsisti said the gifts complemented the women’s ministry goal: to share the love of Christ and make him known through evangelism, visitation and assistance for the less privileged of the community, including the orphans and widows.

“We found it necessary as women in the church to stand in the gap and share the little we have,” Tsisti said. “The church has to uphold the fourfold ministry of Jesus Christ through giving emotionally, spiritual and material support, and (extending) the love of Jesus Christ.”

The Rev. Tafadzwa Mabambe, Maun Mission Area pastor-in-charge, said most members of his congregation of around 30 are women.

Subscribe to our
e-newsletter

Like what you're reading and want to see more? Sign up for our free daily and weekly digests of important news and events in the life of The United Methodist Church.

Keep me informed!

“The women marketed The United Methodist Church,” he said, “by doing works of charity and sharing the word of God with the sick and workers. Some of the patients asked for contact details and where they can find the church.

“In The United Methodist Church,” he continued, “we strongly believe in recognizing and supporting the contribution of women. We believe in the value of women in all aspects of ministry without any exception.”

The Rev. Alan Gurupira, administrative assistant to Zimbabwe Area Bishop Eben Nhiwatiwa, called women’s ministry one of the most vital arms of the church. “Women in The United Methodist Church,” Gurupira said, “are the vanguard, offering service in different committees. They raise funding to support their programs.”

Jesus cared for everyone, including the vulnerable and the sick, Tsisti said, and the women’s ministry should emulate Christ by putting smiles on the faces of vulnerable people.

Dr. Lebogang Mokotedi, hospital superintendent, expressed appreciation on behalf of the hospital. Thanking the church, he called on other corporate bodies to emulate the women’s kind gesture.  

The hospital designed and presented a certificate of appreciation for the church.

COVID-19, Tsisti lamented, has caused economic havoc in society, and the government cannot deal with the situation alone.  

“The opportunity was an eye-opener and a great wake-up call,” she said. “We need to be there for each other in times of need and distress.”

Future endeavors for the women’s ministry include corporate partnerships to help the needy and spread the Gospel.

Muzerengwa is a communicator for the Zimbabwe East Annual Conference.

News media contact: Julie Dwyer at [email protected]. To read more United Methodist news, subscribe to the free Daily or Weekly Digests.


Like what you're reading? Support the ministry of UM News! Your support ensures the latest denominational news, dynamic stories and informative articles will continue to connect our global community. Make a tax-deductible donation at ResourceUMC.org/GiveUMCom.

Sign up for our newsletter!

UMNEWS-SUBSCRIPTION
Evangelism
The Rev. Susan Manyange preaches for the First Street Group, an informal church gathering in Chitungwiza, Zimbabwe, a community that is home to commercial sex workers and many struggling with alcoholism and substance abuse. Manyange is pastor of the nearby Seke East United Methodist Church. Photo by Eveline Chikwanah, UM News.

Church transforms troubled community

Through outreach and a weekly worship service, leaders of Seke East United Methodist Church in Zimbabwe have helped inspire First Street residents to make changes and embrace their faith.
Social Concerns
United Methodist Bishop Gabriel Yemba Unda urges the church to help seek the restoration of peace in Eastern Congo during a “peace caravan” in Tunda, Congo. As part of its 100-year celebration, the church organized a caravan of peace to reflect on the Social Principles and encourage peace in the region. Photo By Philippe Kituka Lolonga, UM News.

United Methodists organize peace caravan in the Congo

Participants laud the church’s acceptance of all people, regardless of tribal affiliation.
Theology and Education
The United Methodist Church’s episcopal residence in Monrovia, Liberia, will be turned over to the United Methodist University’s Graduate School of Professional Studies. Photo by E Julu Swen, UM News.

Episcopal residence decommissioned for educational use in Liberia

The property will be used by the United Methodist University’s Graduate School of Professional Studies.