World Council of Churches

Social Concerns
The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, who is Native American, sings and beats a drum during a joint opening prayer on Aug. 29 during pre-assemblies to the 11th Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Karlsruhe, Germany. Kernell is the executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan. Photo by Albin Hillert, World Council of Churches.

Native American leader discusses threatened cultures

The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan, discusses the realities for Native peoples and the need to promote climate justice.
Ecumenism
Faith leaders from around the world join together during the closing prayer service for the World Council of Churches' 11th Assembly in Karlsruhe, Germany. From right are: The Rev. Heike Springhart of the Evangelical Church in Germany, Bishop Abraham Mar Paulos of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church of Malabar, Metropolitan Zacariah Mar Nicholovos of the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, United Methodist Bishops Sally Dyck and Mary Ann Swenson from the U.S., and the Rev. Hyuk Cho of the United Church of Canada. Photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

WCC General Assembly closes with call to ‘act for justice’

At the 11th General Assembly of the World Council of Churches, around 3,000 participants from 120 countries met to discuss the future direction of ecumenism.
Ecumenism
Members of World Methodist Council denominations gather for a time of fellowship at the United Methodist Church of the Redeemer (Erlšserkirche in German) in Karlsruhe, Germany, during the World Council of Churches' 11th Assembly. The assembly took place Aug. 31 to Sept. 8 under the theme "Christ's Love Moves the World to Reconciliation and Unity." Photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

World Council of Churches assembly focuses on reconciliation

Both Methodist and United Methodist speakers connected the theme of the ecumenical gathering, “Christ’s love moves the world to reconciliation and unity,” to a pending split within the United Methodist denomination.
Social Concerns
The Rev. Susanne Nießner-Brose (right) listens while a 27-year-old Sudanese woman who asked that she be called Fatima relates her story of fleeing Sudan to seek religious freedom in Europe. She was taking asylum in 2017 at the United Methodist Church of the Redeemer in Bremen, Germany, where Nießner-Brose is pastor, and was later accepted as a refugee. File photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

A less welcoming place for refugees

As the migration crisis continues, Europe “is becoming a fortress” where desperate people are being turned away, says a United Methodist pastor in Germany.

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