Native American

Social Concerns
The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, who is Native American, sings and beats a drum during a joint opening prayer on Aug. 29 during pre-assemblies to the 11th Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Karlsruhe, Germany. Kernell is the executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan. Photo by Albin Hillert, World Council of Churches.

Native American leader discusses threatened cultures

The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan, discusses the realities for Native peoples and the need to promote climate justice.
Disaster Relief
Family photos show a four-generation Alaskan fish camp before it was destroyed by typhoon. Photos courtesy of the Rev. Bertha Koweluk, Greater Northwest Conference.

Responding to wreckage of Alaskan typhoon

The typhoon that hit more than 1,000 miles of Alaska coastline in late September didn’t just damage buildings but disrupted generational ways of living for years to come. The fish camps that provide people sustenance are mostly gone.
Social Concerns
Sheila Jones (right) joins in a service of remembrance for missing and murdered indigenous women during the Native Moccasins Rock gathering in Bon Aqua, Tenn. The program is sponsored by the Committee on Native American Ministries of the Tennessee-Western Kentucky Conference of The United Methodist Church. Photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

Weekend spotlights Native culture

An annual gathering celebrating Native American culture under the auspices of the Tennessee-Western Kentucky Conference draws Native and non-Native Americans for dance, art and contemplation of serious issues.
Church History
William Apess was the first Native American licensed to preach by American Methodists. Photo from "A Son of the Forest. The Experience of Will Apes (sic), A Native of the Forest," courtesy of Internet Archive; graphic by Laurens Glass, United Methodist Communications.

Ask The UMC: Pioneers in Methodism — William Apess

William Apess was the first Native American licensed to preach among American Methodists and the leading advocate for Native American rights in the first half of the 19th century.

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