World Methodist Council offers prayers for those in Sandy’s wake, urges contributions to help

NEW YORK — In the Nov. 2 “First Friday” newsletter of the World Methodist Council, the Rev. Ivan Abrahams, the council’s top executive, expressed his prayers and support for those in the United States affected by Hurricane Sandy.

The newsletter also offered information on how to contribute to the relief effort. “A better tomorrow is coming, for our God is the God of hope,” he wrote.

Abrahams, who is from South Africa, noted the importance of the United States joining with the rest of the world and seriously deal with the issue of climate change. “America still needs others, and still needs to look towards its neighbors for direction, council and even inspiration at times,” he said.

“In this world, we all represent a sibilant circle — the actions and deeds of one nation often has direct results on others — and now is the time for all to join the global battle in slowing down man-made climate change.”

A 2009 resolution from the World Methodist Council pointed out that “We are dependent on the earth and must take care of it. If we do so, the land and oceans will yield bounty sufficient for all. Conversely, if human societies damage the earth, people suffer.”

The head of the World Council of Churche also expressed prayers and support in the wake of Sandy in letters to the National Council of Churches in the United States and the Caribbean Conference of Churches

The Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, who preached during the 2012 United Methodist General Conference last spring, wrote that “in this time of recovery when so many local churches are working together to offer emergency relief and support, we see a poignant reminder of how important the common witness and service of the ecumenical family is.”

*Bloom is a United Methodist News Service multimedia reporter based in New York. Follow her at http://twitter.com/umcscribe

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