What’s Happening on Thursday, May 3, 2012

Every morning the Committee on Agenda and Calendar meets at 6:30 a.m. with the presiding bishops for the day, and the chairs of the legislative committees. Here are some notes from that meeting:

  • Presiding Bishops
  • Bishop Thomas Bickerton
  • Bishop Michael Coyner
  • Bishop Scott Jones
  • Bishop James Swanson
  • As of this morning, the General Conference has dealt with 24% of the calendar items eligible for floor debate and consideration (non consent items).
  • The focus of the morning’s session will be the constitutional name change from lay speaker to lay servant. This will be followed by several petitions related to human sexuality.
  • The afternoon session will begin with a conversation on changes in the clergy pension plan.
  • Other items which may be considered:
  • Constitutional changes on the ability of agencies to make decisions on funding and other items between General Conferences.
  • Certified advocates
  • Fund budgets
  • Bishop retirement
  • Balance between lay and clergy
  • Pornography
  • General agency petitions

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