United Methodist Communications Announces InfoServ Change

United Methodist Communications
Office of Public Information
810 12th Avenue S.
Nashville, TN 37203
www.umcpresscenter.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 1, 2009

United Methodist Communications Announces InfoServ Change

Nashville: InfoServ, the official information service of The United Methodist Church, will become exclusively an e-mail and online information service effective April 1, 2010. At that time, telephone support services will be discontinued.

InfoServ is a ministry of United Methodist Communications, which announced in August some program and staff reductions in response to a growing budget deficit and a restructuring plan.

"In these challenging economic times, we must find ways to continue providing high-quality service in a more cost effective manner," said the Rev. Larry Hollon, chief executive of United Methodist Communications. "Telephone calls to InfoServ have been decreasing over the past couple of years as more people take advantage of the Web or use e-mail to request information. We're committed to continuing to provide answers quickly and accurately, but technology allows us to do so more economically."

Customers will be able to submit questions via e-mail at infoserv@umcom.org. Answers to the most frequently asked questions are also available online at www.infoserv.umc.org. In addition, other customer-friendly options such as live chat and leaving a callback number will be explored during the transition period. Depending on the demand, some limited hours for telephone availability may be offered after April 1.

Media Contact: Diane Degnan
(615) 742-5406 (office)
(615) 483-1765 (cell) ddegnan@umcom.org

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