Two dozen nominated for United Methodist Judicial Council

EDITOR’S NOTE: This includes a corrected list of Judicial Council nominees.

Delegates to the 2004 General Conference will choose from 24 nominees for four openings on the Judicial Council, the United Methodist Church’s supreme court.

Nominations made by the denomination’s Council of Bishops were presented to delegates in the April 29 Daily Christian Advocate, and additional nominations were accepted from the floor during that morning’s plenary session. Voting on the nominations is scheduled for the morning of May 3.

Two clergy and two lay people are to be elected to the nine-member council, the highest judicial body of the church. The usual term of office is eight years.

Nominees and their conferences are listed below.

Laity nominated by the Council of Bishops:

  • P. Edwin Gausi, Liberia;
  • Daniel F. Evans, South Indiana;
  • Beth Capen, New York;
  • Jon Gray of Missouri;
  • W. Clark Williams, Virginia; and
  • Lonnie Brooks, Alaska.

Clergy nominated by the Council of Bishops:

  • John E. Harnish, Detroit;
  • Rodney E. Wilmoth, Minnesota;
  • Robert K. Sweet Jr., New England;
  • C. Rex Bevins, Nebraska;
  • Susan T. Henry-Crowe, South Carolina; and
  • Jane A. Tews, Desert Southwest.

Clergy nominated from the floor:

  • Dennis L. Blackwell, Greater New Jersey;
  • Rodney G. Steele, Arkansas;
  • Shamwange Kyungu, North West Katanga;
  • Frank T. Trotter Jr., Baltimore-Washington; and
  • Gloria Brooks, West Ohio.

Laity nominated from the floor:

  • David Beckley, Mississippi;
  • Solomon Christian, Memphis;
  • Raymond L. Hamill, Wyoming;
  • Amy Valdez Barker, Wisconsin;
  • Raymundo Z. Annang, Middle Philippines;
  • Kurt Glassco, Oklahoma; and
  • Daniel A. Ivey-Soto, New Mexico.

*Caldwell is a United Methodist News Service news writer.

News media contact: (412) 325-6080 during General Conference, April 27-May 7. After May 10: (615) 742-5470.

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