Two dozen nominated for United Methodist Judicial Council

EDITOR’S NOTE: This includes a corrected list of Judicial Council nominees.

Delegates to the 2004 General Conference will choose from 24 nominees for four openings on the Judicial Council, the United Methodist Church’s supreme court.

Nominations made by the denomination’s Council of Bishops were presented to delegates in the April 29 Daily Christian Advocate, and additional nominations were accepted from the floor during that morning’s plenary session. Voting on the nominations is scheduled for the morning of May 3.

Two clergy and two lay people are to be elected to the nine-member council, the highest judicial body of the church. The usual term of office is eight years.

Nominees and their conferences are listed below.

Laity nominated by the Council of Bishops:

  • P. Edwin Gausi, Liberia;
  • Daniel F. Evans, South Indiana;
  • Beth Capen, New York;
  • Jon Gray of Missouri;
  • W. Clark Williams, Virginia; and
  • Lonnie Brooks, Alaska.

Clergy nominated by the Council of Bishops:

  • John E. Harnish, Detroit;
  • Rodney E. Wilmoth, Minnesota;
  • Robert K. Sweet Jr., New England;
  • C. Rex Bevins, Nebraska;
  • Susan T. Henry-Crowe, South Carolina; and
  • Jane A. Tews, Desert Southwest.

Clergy nominated from the floor:

  • Dennis L. Blackwell, Greater New Jersey;
  • Rodney G. Steele, Arkansas;
  • Shamwange Kyungu, North West Katanga;
  • Frank T. Trotter Jr., Baltimore-Washington; and
  • Gloria Brooks, West Ohio.

Laity nominated from the floor:

  • David Beckley, Mississippi;
  • Solomon Christian, Memphis;
  • Raymond L. Hamill, Wyoming;
  • Amy Valdez Barker, Wisconsin;
  • Raymundo Z. Annang, Middle Philippines;
  • Kurt Glassco, Oklahoma; and
  • Daniel A. Ivey-Soto, New Mexico.

*Caldwell is a United Methodist News Service news writer.

News media contact: (412) 325-6080 during General Conference, April 27-May 7. After May 10: (615) 742-5470.

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
General Church
The Rev. William B. Lawrence.  Photo by H. Jackson/Southern Methodist University.

Possible steps after General Conference delay

A global pandemic has postponed General Conference, but the former Judicial Council president argues there is still work that cannot wait a year.
General Conference
Clergy members bless the elements of Holy Communion during the 2016 United Methodist General Conference in Portland, Ore. The Commission on the General Conference met March 21 to discuss next steps after coronavirus concerns forced the postponement of this year’s legislative assembly. File photo by Paul Jeffrey, UM News.

Updated: Looking at new General Conference dates

General Conference organizers met in closed session to explore when they could reschedule the lawmaking assembly after the coronavirus-compelled delay.
Global Health
The Minneapolis Convention Center — scheduled to host the 2020 General Conference — announced it is now canceling gatherings of 50 or more people through May 10. The decision comes as General Conference organizers already were considering postponement. Photo by Dan Anderson, courtesy of Meet Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Church leaders postpone 2020 General Conference

With the venue that was scheduled to host is canceling large events through May 10, General Conference organizers decided they have no choice but to find new dates.