Topic: Women in Leadership

As preachers, leaders, teachers, missionaries, organizers, women have shaped the history of the Methodist Church. In their work with the poor, vulnerable and disenfranchised, church women have initiated important social and political reform.

In the Methodist tradition, women were ordained as ministers as early as the late 19th century, and in 1956 the Methodist Church, a predecessor body of The United Methodist Church, granted women full clergy rights. Women now make up approximately 25% of clergy in The United Methodist Church.

We invite you to explore the inspiring stories of women who have made important contributions to the life of the church both past and present as well as resources to help nurture your own participation and witness as a church leader.

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
Local Church
Tiffany Nagel Monroe (left) receives the stole of an elder from the Rev. Linda Harker during a service of ordination June 1, 2016, at St. Luke's United Methodist Church, in Oklahoma City. A report by the Ministry Study Commission about the future of the ordination ministry was presented during the pre-General Conference 2020 briefing held Jan. 23-24 in Nashville. File photo by Hugh W. Scott, Oklahoma Conference.

‘Sacred Trust’ report touts local church leadership

United Methodism should consider returning to its roots by relying more on lay people and ordained local ministers, deacons and elders, according to a church report.
Mission and Ministry
Nester Jeyacheya, deputy head of Mutambara Central Primary School, monitors children as they practice brushing their teeth at the United Methodist mission school in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe. The children learned proper brushing techniques and received toothbrushes and toothpaste as part of dental outreach program led by the church and a Swedish team with Dentists Without Borders. Photo by Kudzai Chingwe, UM News.

Fostering healthy smiles in Zimbabwe

United Methodists collaborate with Swedish dentists to screen, treat and teach rural children about proper dental care.
Evangelism
Mariatu Kogbaka, a former inmate at Freetown Female Correctional Center, shares her story during a thanksgiving service at Brown Memorial United Methodist Church in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Feb. 9. Kogbaka was one of 27 women released on presidential parole in April. She said the Sierra Leone Conference's prison ministry played a significant role in securing her freedom. Photo by Phileas Jusu, UM News.

Sierra Leone prison ministry advocates for inmates

Church group supports female prisoners with counseling, training while they are incarcerated and after they’ve been released.