Technology for Social Good

Harnessing the power of technology

Technology alone is never the solution. Technology by itself is confusing, breaks down, wears out, and provides little humanitarian relief.

But when technology is used for good by people who want to improve their own communities through health, education, agriculture, income generation, sharing God’s love, etc., then human and community development occurs. Lives can be made better. Lives can be saved.

 

Stories of technology building better lives


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Evangelism
The Rev. Tom Berlin (left) presents a copy of his book, “Courage,” to Massachusetts National Guard Chaplain Chad McCabe in the chapel at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington. McCabe, whose unit was assigned to help provide security at the U.S. Capitol after the January riot, contacted Wesley Seminary asking for Bibles, novels and board games for troops stationed there. Photo by Lisa Helfert for Wesley Theological Seminary. Copyright 2021. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Church responds to chaplain's call to help soldiers

A National Guard chaplain got Bibles, games and 150 copies of a new book about courage when he turned to Wesley Theological Seminary for help keeping soldiers occupied in Washington in the aftermath of the Capitol insurrection.
Mission and Ministry
United Nations peacekeepers from Zambia visit with a family while on patrol in the Central African Republic in February, 2020. Following a volatile presidential election there, United Methodists are offering humanitarian aid to people seeking refuge from armed rebels. File photo by Hervé Serefio, United Nations.

Church helps displaced in Central African Republic

Following a volatile presidential election, United Methodists offer shelter and other humanitarian aid to people seeking refuge from armed rebels.
General Church
The General Conference of The United Methodist Church was originally scheduled to meet last year in Minneapolis. With COVID-19 still a threat, questions remain about whether General Conference can go forward as planned Aug. 29-Sept. 7, whether in Minneapolis or online. Photo by Krivit Photography, courtesy of Meet Minneapolis; image of laptop by Kathryn Price, United Methodist Communications; graphic by Laurens Glass, UM News.

A virtual General Conference faces hurdles

The chair of the General Conference commission recently outlined the challenges facing organizers of the United Methodist legislative assembly.