Statement from Bishop Linda Lee of the Wisconsin Conference

“The trial was truly a heart-wrenching and painful process. Yet, we have hope because of our common faith in Jesus Christ, and trust that some growth and good can come from this. I believe it was handled with as much integrity as possible. And I appreciated the mutual regard for each other expressed by the persons on both sides of the case, and all the persons who participated including the respondent, jurors, witnesses, counsels, the secretary and assistant for the trial, court reporter, our presiding officer, the host church, and all who helped in any way. A chargeable offense did occur; a penalty has been determined.

“Yet, there can be no real winners in a process which is adversarial in nature. There continue to be difficult questions with no ready answers as we face the months between now and General Conference in 2012. My prayer is that, as Christians, and as United Methodists, we will use this experience as a gateway to reconciliation, healing and restoration of our relationship with one another and with Christ.”

Blessings,

Bishop Linda Lee
Wisconsin Conference

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
General Church
Kenneth Feinberg (holding microphone), speaks during a livestreamed panel discussion in Tampa, Fla., with members of the team that developed a new proposal that would maintain The United Methodist Church but allow traditionalist congregations to separate into a new denomination. Feinberg moderated the work of the team that created the proposal, called the "Protocol of Reconciliation & Grace Through Separation.” Photo by Sam Hodges, UM News.

Panel offers peek behind scenes of separation plan

United Methodist participants talk about forming Protocol of Reconciliation & Grace Through Separation in livestream.
General Church
On Jan. 3, a 16-member group of United Methodist bishops and other leaders offered the “Protocol of Reconciliation & Grace Through Separation” proposal to preserve The United Methodist Church while allowing for a new traditionalist-minded denomination. UM News reports on the process the group took to arrive at its plan. Graphic by Laurens Glass, UM News.

Protocol process painful but fruitful

Participants in mediation talk about how agreement was found among markedly different perspectives for the future of The United Methodist Church.
General Church
Famed mediator Kenneth Feinberg speaks during a forum at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, in May 2011. Feinberg helped a diverse group of United Methodist bishops and other leaders reach an agreement, released Jan. 3, on a "Protocol of Reconciliation & Grace Through Separation." Photo courtesy of the Miller Center, Creative Commons.

Feinberg kept church negotiators at table

Mediator of 9/11 victims' fund played key role in separation plan worked out by diverse team of United Methodist leaders.