Seeing a Way Forward: Bishop Yambasu

Bishop John Yambasu gives the sermon during morning worship May 19 at the 2016 United Methodist General Conference in Portland, Ore. File photo by Paul Jeffrey, UMNS.
Bishop John Yambasu gives the sermon during morning worship at the 2016 General Conference. File photo by Paul Jeffrey, UMNS.
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area acknowledges the anxiety stemming from debates about the future of The United Methodist Church, but insists that God “will lead his church to where he wants his church to be.”

Yambasu spoke with UM News as part of “Seeing a Way Forward,” a video series featuring different perspectives of church leaders on the work of the Commission on a Way Forward.

Watch videos.


“It is God’s church.”
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area acknowledges the anxiety stemming from debates about the future of The United Methodist Church, but insists that God “will lead his church to where he wants his church to be.”

“Marriage should be between man and woman.”
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area outlines his support for the Traditional Plan, one of several proposals being considered by the 2019 Special General Conference over the denomination’s stance on homosexuality.

Bishop discusses One Church Plan implications for Africa
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area considers the One Church Plan to have several advantages for the African church, but also calls for more education on the concerns that support for the plan would constitute support for homosexuality. The One Church Plan is one of several proposals being considered by the 2019 Special General Conference over the denomination’s stance on homosexuality.

Sierra Leone bishop looks at all three plans for GC2019
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area says each of the proposals being considered by the 2019 Special General Conference over the denomination’s stance on homosexuality has its own implications for churches in Africa.

What a church split means for Africa
Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area says he continues to pray the church doesn’t split over the debate on the denomination’s stance on homosexuality. But regardless, he says, the church will still continue its mission of spreading the gospel.

“Rethink our calling as a church."
Leading up to the called 2019 Special General Conference, Bishop John Yambasu of the Sierra Leone Episcopal Area questions spending so many church resources “legislating sex” when there continues to be hunger, poverty and disease in so much of the world.


This is the third in a series of video interviews by United Methodist News Service. View the interviews with Bishop Cynthia Fierro Harvey and Bishop Christian Alsted.

Sign up for our newsletter!

SUBSCRIBE

Latest News

Evangelism
Members of the Sierra Leone Conference prison ministry serve a meal to a detainee at Kingtom Remand Home, a facility for juvenile offenders, in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Photo by Saidu Samura, Sierra Leone Correctional Services.

Prison ministry delivers gifts, hope

Members of the Sierra Leone Conference, UMW missionaries visit young detainees at Kingtom Remand Home to celebrate Day of the African Child.
Mission and Ministry
Finda Quiwa (third from left), a United Methodist missionary, joins members of Finda Quiwa House at the May 2 Young Women's Gathering in Yonibana, Sierra Leone. Photo by Phileas Jusu, UM News.

Young women's program revived in Sierra Leone

Six years after shutting down in Sierra Leone, the Young Women’s Network is active again thanks to a donation by Discipleship Ministries.
Global Health
Kate Rhodes (left) leads students from House of the Carpenter back from a field trip on Wheeling Island in Wheeling, W.Va. Rhodes was serving as youth coordinator for the program's Pre-Work Camp, which teaches basic employment skills to middle school students. House of the Carpenter is a mission project of The United Methodist Church's West Virginia Conference.

Ministries help children affected by addiction

Children in addicted households are in danger of falling into the same cycle without support. One devoted mentor can make a world of difference.