Sandy giving now at $6.1 million; teams needed

NEW YORK (UMNS) — United Methodists are continuing to contribute both money and volunteer time to the denomination’s relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Sandy.

As of the week of Jan. 21, the United Methodist Committee on Relief had received $6.1 million in donations for Sandy relief.

The funds will support the “Generation Restoration” initiative, a partnership of the United Methodist Board of Discipleship’s Young People Ministries and the Greater New Jersey Conference. The initiative will use a coordinating team of United Methodist young adults to connect thousands of youth and young adults with recovery efforts in New Jersey, New York, Maryland and likely West Virginia.

In a recent letter to the New England Annual (regional) Conference, Bishop Sudarshana Devadhar thanked church members for donating $77,100 in general Sandy relief and raising an additional $29,674 for the Greater New Jersey Annual Conference Disaster Relief Fund.

Long-term recovery volunteer teams for Sandy can now register for work through the following conferences:

New York Conference: Five sites open, register online

Greater New Jersey Conference: Nine sites open, register online

Peninsula-Delaware Conference: Schedule teams through the Disaster Response Coordinator, Rich Walton. They are working on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Crisfield, Maryland.

West Virginia Conference: Contact Jenny Gannaway

For more information, contact your jurisdictional UMVIM coordinator.

Donations to UMCOR for Sandy relief

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