Repentance is never a ‘one time’ experience

“An Act of Repentance toward Healing Relationships with Indigenous Peoples” will take place at 7:30 p.m. April 27. In a press conference before the worship service, The Rev. George E. “Tink” Tinker, said he was honored and has so much respect for The United Methodist Church for taking this step because the process is difficult and complex. “It will be my job to explain in 30 minutes how to make right a little over 500 years of Christian invasion and imperialism.” Tinker, who is a citizen of the Osage Nation and an indigenous advocate and theologian, will be the worship service’s keynote speaker. Tinker is on the faculty at United Methodist-related Iliff School of Theology in Denver and an ordained pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. “Repentance is never a one-time experience,” he said. “Repenting needs to be a way of life."

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The Rev. Thomas Kim. Photo by Kathleen Barry, UM News

Enforced COVID-19 isolation recalls days in prison

The Rev. Thomas Kim reflects on how the enforced isolation recalls his time in prison. While that isolation is hard to take, he writes that it is nearly impossible to take the racism and xenophobia aimed at Asian Americans.
The Rev. Knut Refsdal. Photo by Karl A. Ellingsen

God’s role in times of crisis

Humanity has never found a good explanation for why there is suffering in the world. Why do so many seem to accept that bad answers are better than no answers?
General Church
The Rev. William B. Lawrence.  Photo by H. Jackson/Southern Methodist University.

Possible steps after General Conference delay

A global pandemic has postponed General Conference, but the former Judicial Council president argues there is still work that cannot wait a year.