Powerless Far Rockaway Mission Continues to Serve

The United Methodist Center in the Far Rockaway section of Queens, continues to keeps its doors open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily despite the continued lack of electricity, according to Rev. Bill Shillady, executive director of the United Methodist City Society. They are able to serve coffee and rolls, and sometimes soup thanks to a generator. They are also distributing whatever donated items come in from individuals and groups.

The mission director, Mearl Grant, lost his car in Hurricane Sandy, but is committed to keeping the center open during daylight hours. He said that people are more worried about staying warm and eating then cleaning their homes right now. Grant said that what the people in the community need most is non-perishable food items, coats, wool hats, gloves, blankets, toiletry kits, and candles.

The Far Rockaway Mission has served the community for nearly 20 years and had been providing hot meals five days a week, a food pantry and clothing giveaways, in addition to worship services. It is located at 1032 Beach 19th Street in Far Rockaway, N.Y.


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