Parsonage Becomes Shelter; Gas Woes May Slow Help

The Community United Methodist Church is without power like much of its Massapequa, N.Y., neighborhood, but two families in the congregation have found shelter at the parsonage with Pastor Jeff Wells and his family. Wells opened the parsonage – which has electricity – to the families whose homes were seriously damaged by Hurricane Sandy. He reports that the homes of at least 14 members of the congregation on Long Island’s South Shore have suffered severe damage. The church itself sustained minor damage when a falling tree limb punctured a hole in the roof. The limb was removed, and there seems to be no additional structural damage.

Attempts to put together a volunteer work team to go to Massapequa tomorrow were being hampered by concerns about limited gas supplies, according to Warren Ferry, the disaster coordinator for the Long Island East District of the New York Annual Conference.

By Rev. Joanne Utley, Communications coordinator for the New York Annual Conference

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