One-handed thanks is still good enough

Missionary pilot Jacques Umembudi, with the Wings of the Morning Aviation Ministry in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is a delegate to General Conference for the Central Congo Conference. At the Advance display, he told this story:

“Just last year, I had an emergency call concerning a school teacher who was walking close to a river and was attacked by a crocodile. The crocodile snapped off his left arm. He was bleeding to death when I found him, and we flew him to a nearby Presbyterian hospital. Almost 3 weeks later, I was called to fly him back home. He wanted to express his gratitude to us.

“The man started to cry. You see, Africans use both hands to take the two hands of another to say thank you. He said, ‘I cannot express my gratitude. I don’t have my left hand anymore. But please understand, I am very grateful to you for saving my life.’  And I told him, ‘Just stay thanks to God, because he’s the one who provided.’”

UMCOR Aviation Ministries can be supported by giving to Advance #3019626.

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