Oklahoma Tornado: Cleaning buckets always appreciated

“Our material resource ministry is extremely important for two reasons,” said the Rev. Tom Hazelwood, who formerly headed UMCOR’s disaster response in the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America.

“It provides people who sit in the pew an opportunity to use their hands in a tangible way to respond to disasters and help individuals all over the world when they cannot personally go and volunteer. They are still the hands of Christ that have put the kit together.”

Read more about relief supplies here.

How disaster giving works

When both the United Methodist Committee on Relief and an annual conference ask for funds, United Methodists who want to help in a disaster might be uncertain where to send donations.

Conferences may set up their own funds to help with the immediate needs of housing, food, shelter and transportation. Conference fundraising is intended for raising money within the conference to meet immediate needs.

Giving to UMCOR through The Advance, the United Methodist official giving channel, ensures that 100 hundred percent of each donation goes directly to the need specified. UMCOR’s administrative costs are covered through a separate fund supported by One Great Hour of Sharing.

Read more about how disaster giving works.

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Mission and Ministry
A child is transported inside an empty refrigerator during floods after Cyclone Idai, in Buzi, outside Beira, Mozambique. The United Methodist Committee on Relief has allocated three $10,000 grants for immediate, emergency short-term funding to meet basic human needs of those affected in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi. Photo by Siphiwe Sibeko, REUTERS

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Mission and Ministry
Lydia Chimonyo Girls High School students carry buckets to gather water at a borehole in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe. There is no running water at the school since Cyclone Idai damaged the school’s water plant. Photo by the Rev. Duncan Charwadza.

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Photo of retired Bishop Michael J. Coyner, courtesy of the Indiana Conference of The United Methodist Church website.

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