My church

As I grew up in the small town of Flekkefjord in the south-west of Norway, my church was a white brick church just a few meters from my home. In my church I could play, learn about Jesus, feel safe and meet kind people everywhere. I love my church!

When I got older I moved away to study at the university. I found my church in Rådhusgata in Kristiansand, in southern Norway. It is the oldest tree church in the whole of Kristiansand. In my church I could play, learn more about Jesus, learn others about Jesus, feel safe and meet kind people everywhere. I love my church!

After 5 years I had finished my studies, and it was time to get a job. My wife and I moved to Oslo, in the eastern part of Norway, and found our church in St. Olavsgt. That chruch is located in a modern office building, nothing like the wooden church in Kristiansand or the brick church in Flekkefjord. In our church we can play, learn even more about Jesus, learn others about Jesus, feel safe and meet kind people everywhere. We love our chruch!

When I am abroad, or just travelling about in Norway, I find my church many places: At Bramford Road (Ipswich, England), at Sommerfesten (an all-generations camp held each summer in southern Norway) at Forth Worth Hilton Hotel (in Texas, 2007 at «Living Faith, Seeking Justice»), in downtown Halden (Norway), at Hinde Street (London, England) and many, many other places.

A couple of days ago I found my church i Hyde Park, here in Tampa, Flordia. And yesterday I found my church in Tampa Convention Center.

My church is not a building.

My church is a movment.

My church is the United Methodist Church – and I love my church!

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