More news on the restructuring front

Jay Brim, who as chair of the Connectional Table’s legislative committee led the drafting of the Call to Action restructuring legislation, offered more news on the legislative front yesterday.

Greg Nelson, the director of communications for the Oregon-Idaho Annual (regional) Conference, reported this news at the Association of Lay Leaders meeting on April 23.

Brim announced that backers of the Call to Action restructuring plan would let the General Council on Finance and Administration remain as a separate agency. Under the current legislation, GCFA would be merged with eight other agencies to form the new Center for Connectional Mission and Ministry.

Brim told the lay leaders that Call to Action plan would still streamline agency operations by getting rid of once or twice yearly board meetings for most, or as Brim called them, “junkets that happen once or twice a year to ratify work that has been done by better people.”

Tracy Merrick, who helped draft the Methodist Federation for Social Action’s alternative restructuring plan, also had his own news to announce.

He said MFSA would “now accept and would support a change to their plan” so that the United Methodist Board of Pension and Health Benefits would remain on its own.

Both changes came after United Methodist chancellors, GCFA board members and the pension board raised concerns that merging finances and programming would increase the denomination’s liability risk.

These plans, as well as Plan B, also discussed at the lay leaders meeting, will go before the General Administration Legislative Committee on Thursday.


Like what you're reading? Support the ministry of UM News! Your support ensures the latest denominational news, dynamic stories and informative articles will continue to connect our global community. Make a tax-deductible donation at ResourceUMC.org/GiveUMCom.

Sign up for our newsletter!

UMNEWS-SUBSCRIPTION
General Church
The Rev. Dr. Jean Claude Masuka Maleka. Photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

Is church separation a good or bad idea?

Separation in the church could affect Africa more than any other continent, and United Methodists must work to keep the unity of the Body of Christ.
Bishops
The Holston Conference’s Bishop Mary Virginia Taylor embraces the Rev. David Graves following his election as United Methodist bishop at the Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference in 2016. On April 30, the Council of Bishops affirmed its decision to delay electing any new leaders until after the postponed General Conference. File photo by Annette Spence, Holston Conference.

Bishops’ election plans draw mixed reaction

Many General Conference delegates praised the bishops for retracting an earlier recommendation of four-year hold on United Methodist elections. But some still have misgivings about a delay until 2022.
General Church
The three European central conferences of The United Methodist Church covering 32 countries and 10 time zones are making plans for a proposed denomination-wide split. Four bishops (clockwise from top left), Edward Khegay, Christian Alsted, Harald Rückert and Patrick Streiff, have drafted next steps should a separation plan win General Conference approval. Image courtesy of the bishops.

Europeans make plans for separation

Under a proposed separation plan, some European churchgoers expect to remain with The United Methodist Church while others join a new traditionalist denomination.