Methodism in Central America: Challenges, Faith and Hope

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GUATEMALA CITY (UMNS) – Gang violence and corruption plague the countries of Honduras and Guatemala. The United Methodist Church in Honduras and the autonomous Methodist Church in Guatemala are addressing poverty and violence through faith and fortitude. In the summer of 2017, a visit by United Methodist leadership signaled a growing commitment to these churches.

Read all stories from United Methodist News Service's trip to Central America in our Special Report: Honduras and Guatemala 2017.


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