Korean Ministry Plan Wins Continuation

A move to continue the Korean American National Plan was overwhelmingly approved May 5 by the United Methodist General Conference.

"I have been a United Methodist pastor for 22 years, but this is probably the year I will most remember," said the Rev. Brandon Cho, director of the plan. "This is the year of working together as one team. The Korean National Plan is not just an ethnocentric plan for the Korean community, it is everyone’s ministry in the United Methodist Church."

Developers of the five ethnic initiatives of the church proposed to the General Conference worked together as a team and supported each other’s plans. The plans are:

  • Native American Comprehensive Plan
  • Asian American Language Ministry
  • Strengthening the Black Church for the 21st Century
  • Korean American National Plan
  • National Plan for Hispanic/Latino Ministry

By a vote of 870 to 42, the conference approved continuing the Korean plan with a budget of $3.2 million, which is included in the budget of the Board of Global Ministries.

In other action the conference also approved continuing the Asian American Language Ministry Study with a budget of $1.6 million and the National Plan for Hispanic/Latino Ministry with a budget of $3.8 million. Funds for those initiatives are also included in the budget for the Board of Global Ministries.

*Gilbert is a staff writer for United Methodist News Service.

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