Journey toward Act of Repentance

Journey toward 2012 Act of Repentance worship will take place this evening (April 27) at 7:30 p.m. during the General Conference. It is intended to be an acknowledgement of wrongs done to indigenous persons and the beginning of a process to heal relationships between indigenous communities and the church (DCA p.1876). The General Commission on Christian Unity and Inter-religious Concerns has worked diligently to bring this together by actively being engaged in dialogue with many persons including indigenous persons.

We hope that the worship this evening is a time of active listening and a ritual of embarking on a healing journey. Let us prepare our hearts for listening!


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