Imagine No Malaria releases updated “Killer in the Dark” documentary

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 20, 2013

Imagine No Malaria releases updated "Killer in the Dark" documentary

Documentary narrated by actress Pauley Perrette from top-rated TV show "NCIS" will air on NBC affiliates starting May 5

Nashville, Tenn.:United Methodist Communications is releasing an updated version of the Imagine No Malaria documentary, "Killer in the Dark: An Extraordinary Effort to Combat Malaria," in collaboration with the Interfaith Broadcasting Commission. The documentary, originally produced in 2011, is about The United Methodist Church's work to help make the world malaria-free.

This sequel, set to air on NBC affiliates from May 5 through November 3, reflects new research and scientific advancements in the fight against malaria.

Actress Pauley Perrette, who stars in the top-rated TV series "NCIS," narrates "Killer in the Dark." Perrette, an active member of Hollywood United Methodist Church, donated her time and services to the effort. She also narrated the original version of the documentary and remains a passionate supporter of Imagine No Malaria.

"Killer in the Dark" features diverse voices that are working together to stop malaria from killing one person every 60 seconds. Those voices include scientists, advocates and health workers on the frontlines of the effort in both the U.S. and Africa.

The documentary highlights the work of Emory University researchers who have a contract with the National Institutes of Health. It also focuses on the advocacy of Elisabeth Clymer, an 18-year-old college student who is now pursuing a career in global health after involvement with Imagine No Malaria at the local church level changed the course of her life. Additional footage demonstrates how Imagine No Malaria empowers community health workers in Africa to be better equipped to prevent and treat the disease.

"Malaria ravages more than 40 percent of our planet," said the Rev. Larry Hollon, chief executive of United Methodist Communications, the agency that produced the documentary. "More than 650,000 people are killed by malaria every year in Africa. 85 to 90 percent of these deaths are women and children. Progress is happening thanks in part to the people of The United Methodist Church. Malaria's death rate is almost half of what it was at the start of the effort."

Imagine No Malaria has raised more than $31.2 million to date, trained more than 5,800 community health workers and distributed more than 1.2 million mosquito nets in Africa.

Check your local NBC station to find out when "Killer in the Dark" will air in your area and express interest in having them include it in their programming. For more information about Imagine No Malaria, go to imaginenomalaria.org/akillerinthedark.

About Imagine No Malaria
Imagine No Malaria is an initiative of The United Methodist Church to raise $75 million to end preventable deaths from malaria in Africa by 2015. With a comprehensive approach to fighting this killer disease, Imagine No Malaria empowers the people of Africa to improve health infrastructure and achieve a sustainable victory over malaria. For more information, visit ImagineNoMalaria.org.

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Media contact:
Diane Degnan
ddegnan@umcom.org
(615) 742-5406 (office)
(615) 483-1765 (cell)

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