George Tinker urges continuing repentance

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"No apologies. Just repent. Seriously." was the Rev. Dr. George E. Tinker's message during "An Act of Repentance toward Healing Relationships with Indigenous Peoples." The service took place on Friday evening, April 27, during the 2012 General Conference of The United Methodist Church.


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Faith Stories
Donald Reasoner (front), then coordinator of language interpretation services for The United Methodist Church’s Board of Global Ministries, is welcomed to the Icolo e Bengo United Methodist Church in Luanda, Angola, site of the 2006 West Angola Annual Conference. Reasoner, the son of missionary parents, has spent more than 30 years providing interpretation and translation for the denomination. To Reasoner’s right is Kathy L. Gilbert, a writer for UM News, now retired. File photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

A ministry of interpretation

The son of missionary parents, Donald Reasoner honed his communication skills by translating and interpreting for English-speaking visitors to Brazil.
Social Concerns
The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, who is Native American, sings and beats a drum during a joint opening prayer on Aug. 29 during pre-assemblies to the 11th Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Karlsruhe, Germany. Kernell is the executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan. Photo by Albin Hillert, World Council of Churches.

Native American leader discusses threatened cultures

The Rev. Glen “Chebon” Kernell, executive director of the United Methodist Native American Comprehensive Plan, discusses the realities for Native peoples and the need to promote climate justice.
Disaster Relief
Family photos show a four-generation Alaskan fish camp before it was destroyed by typhoon. Photos courtesy of the Rev. Bertha Koweluk, Greater Northwest Conference.

Responding to wreckage of Alaskan typhoon

The typhoon that hit more than 1,000 miles of Alaska coastline in late September didn’t just damage buildings but disrupted generational ways of living for years to come. The fish camps that provide people sustenance are mostly gone.