GC2012 End-of-Day Prayer, May 2

Last night’s closing prayer after evening worship, adapted from the Book of Uncommon Prayer 2, was on “Sleep.” Closing worship is the last order of the day, and upon leaving worship we get ready to sleep, and prepare for the next day:

God, it’s okay to close our eyes. Everything that is here today will be there tomorrow. We aren’t going to miss anything. You designed these bodies, God. You made us to run AND to rest. You made us to get weary and to renew. Give us a peaceful night. Give us good dreams. Give us warm blankets and a soft pillow, and give us love in our hearts for those who do without these comforts. Let us experience rest with our whole selves. Wake us in the morning, refreshed. Wake us in the new day as new people. You are the new day, God. Let us wake to greet you and make you part of our lives. Amen.

If you’re attending General Conference, how do you close your day? How do you prepare for sleep and the next day? How well do you sleep? How are your dreams? How do you wake? How do you stay refreshed and renewed, ready for new tasks ahead?

Join us tonight and tomorrow for the last two evening prayer meetups from United Methodist Women, near the West Hall entrance, 5 minutes following the close of worship!


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