GC2012: 4 elected to University Senate

DSC_6740 Christine Schneider, Switzerland-France-North Africa, seeking to be recognized during the debate over the role and support of the president of the Council of Bishops, at the 2012 United Methodist General Conference in Tampa, Fla. A UMNS photo by John C. Goodwin.
Click on image to enlarge.View more photos.

Jan Love, the Rev. Kasap Owan, the Rev. William J. Abraham and the Rev. Bill T. Arnold were elected to the University Senate during the April 30 morning session of the 2012 United Methodist General Conference.

The University Senate comprises 25 voting members who at the time of election are actively engaged in the work of education at an educational institution. The four will serve four-year terms.

Love, dean of Candler School of Theology, and Owan, president of Katanga Methodist University, were elected to fill the role as chief executive officers of United Methodist-related institutions. Abraham, professor at Perkins School of Theology, and Arnold, former provost of Asbury Theological Seminary, were elected to fill the roles of other positions relevant to academic or financial affairs or church relationships.

The University Senate, established in 1882, is one of the oldest accrediting bodies in the United States. Its mission was to ensure that schools, colleges and universities related to the church were worthy of carrying the denomination's name. In recent years, regional bodies have accredited academic institutions, and the senate has focused more on how institutions are related to The United Methodist Church.

The 25-member body of professionals in higher education has responsibility for supporting the development of institutions whose aims are to address significant educational, cultural, societal and human issues in a manner reflecting the values held in common by the institutions and The United Methodist Church.

Nominations to the University Senate come from the National Association of Schools and Colleges and Universities of the denomination, United Methodist Board of Higher Education and Ministry, General Conference, Council of Bishops and the University Senate itself.

*Gilbert is a multimedia reporter for the young adult content team at United Methodist Communications, Nashville, Tenn.

News media contact: Kathy L. Gilbert, Tampa, Fla., (813) 574-4837, through May 4; after May 4, Nashville, Tenn., (615) 742-5470, or [email protected].

Sign up for our newsletter!

umnews-subscriptions
General Conference
The North Texas Conference voted at its Sept. 19 annual meeting to submit legislation to General Conference 2021 that would begin the process of changing the church’s Cross and Flame insignia. Logo courtesy of United Methodist Communications.

Conference backs replacing Cross and Flame

North Texas Conference joins pastor in saying the insignia of The United Methodist Church is, inadvertently, racially insensitive.
Social Concerns
Since the Church’s inception, Methodists have been actively involved in social and political matters in order to build a more peaceful and just world. Graphic by Laurens Glass, United Methodist Communications.

Ask The UMC: Is The United Methodist Church involved in politics?

Can United Methodists be politically active? The Social Principles offer guidance about the interaction of church and politics.
Social Concerns
The coronavirus pandemic has presented unique challenges to the U.S. census this year. Robbinsville United Methodist Church is one of the churches trying to help make sure everyone counts. Photo illustration by Kathleen Barry, UM News.

Churches see census as part of their mission

United Methodists across the U.S. are helping hard-to-count people ‘come to their census.’ In doing so, they hope to strengthen their communities.