Gates thanks United Methodists for partnership

Gates is applauded by Bishops Janice Riggle Huie and Thomas Bickerton. A UMNS photo by Mike DuBose.

United Methodists have decided to wipe out malaria because "brothers and sisters don't sit back and let each other die," said William H. Gates Sr., co-chair of the Bill &; Melinda Gates Foundation.

"I am here today to thank you," he told the 2008 United Methodist General Conference on May 1, during its worldwide legislative meeting.

"We are proud to be your partner in this campaign to end the world's worst killer of children. We believe the campaign cannot succeed without you."

The United Methodist Church is a founding partner of the Nothing But Nets anti-malaria campaign, which fights the disease by purchasing and distributing insecticide-treated sleeping nets in Africa. More than $20 million has been raised since the campaign began in 2006.

The church also recently received a $5 million grant from the U.N. Foundation, with support from the Bill &; Melinda Gates Foundation, to fight malaria and other diseases of poverty. The money will support a fund-raising and educational campaign to help prevent deaths related to malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.

'Mutual responsibility'

Bishops Eben Nhiwatiwa, Arthur Kulah, Thomas Bickerton and Janice Riggle Huie listen. A UMNS photo by Maile Bradfield.

Gates addressed the General Conference during its 10-day meeting to decide church policy for the next four years. Working to achieve global health is one of the denomination's four newly named areas of focus.

"Almost 300 years ago, your founder, John Wesley, explained the moral implications of what is now fashionably called globalization," he said. "Wesley's statement 'I look on all the world as my parish,' describes our mutual responsibility."

Gates, founding partner of a Seattle law firm and the father of Microsoft founder Bill Gates, asked the nearly 1,000 delegates to make a personal commitment to help The United Methodist Church end malaria. He said the fight is going to take billions of dollars, more health clinics in more countries and politicians who make the goal a priority.

"But more than anything, the fight against malaria is going to take a firm commitment to John Wesley's idea," he said. "You are 12 million people armed with the conviction that all the world is your parish. That makes you the most powerful weapon there is against malaria."

Delegates and visitors hear Gates' address on malaria. A UMNS photo by John C. Goodwin.

Bishop Eben Nhiwatiwa, of the church's Zimbabwe Area, offered thanks to Gates and the church for all the bed nets that have and will be distributed in Africa. Nhiwatiwa said he had participated in distributing nets in a small village in Zimbabwe.

"That village is very far away, but your helping hand has reached there," he said. Nets that save "tender children are the future of Africa and all of us.

*Gilbert is a United Methodist News Service writer based in Nashville, Tenn.

News media contact: Kathy Gilbert, e-mail: newsdesk@umcom.org.

Phone calls can be made to the General Conference Newsroom in Fort Worth, Texas, at (817) 698-4405 until May 3. Afterward, call United Methodist News Service in Nashville, Tenn., at (615) 742-5470.

Related Articles

General Conference headlines

Gates, Sr. to Address United Methodist General Conference

$5 million grant boosts Global Health Initiative

Resources

General Conference 2008

Bill &; Melinda Gates Foundation

William H. Gates Sr. Biography

Sign up for our newsletter!

SUBSCRIBE
General Church
A group of centrist, progressive and traditionalist church leaders have come up with a plan for The United Methodist Church to separate amicably into two or more denominations. It's called the Indianapolis Plan, after where the group met. Photo by William Sturgell, courtesy of Pixabay; graphic by UM News.

Group drafts separation plan for denomination

Citing irreconcilable differences over homosexuality, a theologically diverse team of 12 envisions ʻnew expressions’ of United Methodism in a plan for the church’s future.
General Church
Bishop Rodolfo Alfonso “Rudy” Juan, who leads the Davao Area in the southern Philippines, preaches at the Commission on General Conference meeting in Lexington, Ky. Juan expressed disappointment in the decision not to hold the 2024 General Conference in the Philippines. Photo by Heather Hahn, UM News.

Plans canceled for GC2024 in Philippines

The 2024 gathering was expected to be the first time The United Methodist Church’s lawmaking assembly met outside the United States.
General Conference
Spare voting machines rest on a table at the 2019 United Methodist General Conference in St. Louis. Photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

Ask The UMC: How are decisions made at General Conference?

General Conference is the highest legislative body in The United Methodist Church. It usually convenes once every four years to determine the denomination’s future direction.