Ethnic National Plans - Unity through Diversity

Ethnic ministries serve a critical role within The United Methodist Church ofcreatingunity throughdiversity. Recognizing the unique cultural experiences offered by ethnic communities, the plans seek to strengthen these communities as part of the body of the church. Many plans, like Strengthening the Black Church for the 21st Century, have extended their ministry programs beyond their own communities to help strengthening the entire church and increase the number of vital congregations.

The ethnic national plans of The United Methodist Church are:

  • Asian American Language Ministry,
  • Native American Comprehensive Plan,
  • National Plan for Hispanic/Latino Ministry,
  • Strengthening the Black Church for the 21st Century , and
  • United Methodist Council on Korean American Ministries.

How are ethnic plans funded?

Ethnic ministry plansreceivefunding from World Service Funds. General Agencies offer administrative support for ministry plans.

What is the difference between the Ethnic National Plans and the 5 Caucus Groups?

The ethnic plans focus on program ministry for the racial/ethnic communities of The United Methodist Church. The five official caucus groups are:

  • Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc. (BMCR),
  • Metodistas Associados Representando la Causa de Hispano-Americanos (MARCHA),
  • National Federation of Asian American United Methodists (NFAAUM),
  • Native American International Caucus (NAIC), and
  • Pacific Islander National Caucus of United Methodists (PINCUM).

The caucus groups advocate for the concerns and needs of racial/ethnic persons in The United Methodist Church.

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