Details of penalty for Rev. Amy DeLong

After more than six hours of deliberations, a jury of 13 United Methodist clergy voted 9-4 to suspend the Rev. Amy DeLong for 20 days beginning July 1.

The suspension, the jury wrote, is to be used for spiritual discernment in preparation for a process seeking to restore the broken clergy covenant relationship.

The process is to include:

  1. An open and collaborative communication, which shall include the Rev. Amy DeLong; Wisconsin Area Bishop Linda Lee, the Rev. Jorge Mayorga Solis (DeLong’s district superintendent), the Rev. Richard Strait (chair of the Wisconsin Conference Board of Ordained Ministry), and a Wisconsin United Methodist elder of DeLong’s choosing.
  2. DeLong will initiate a written document outlining procedures for clergy in order to help resolve issues that harm the clergy covenant, create an adversarial spirit or lead to future clergy trials. The document shall be informed by the Bible, the 2008 Book of Discipline, Judicial Council rulings and other relevant materials.
  3. DeLong will write the first draft in collaboration with the persons named above and will present that draft to the conference board of ordained ministry by Jan. 1.
  4. After review and edit by DeLong and the people named in the first point, the final document will be completed in time to be distributed to the clergy of the Wisconsin Conference before the 2012 annual conference gathering, to be acted on in the 2012 clergy session.

Failure by DeLong to comply with the requirements will result in a suspension from the exercise of the functions of an ordained elder of The United Methodist Church for a period of a year beginning June 3, 2012.

Approval of a penalty by the jury required at least seven votes.

United Methodist News Service reporter Heather Hahn and photographer Mike DuBose are covering the trial and will post coverage here as well as on the UMNS Facebookpage and Flickr.

Sign up for our newsletter!

SUBSCRIBE

Latest News

General Church
Bishop Cynthia Fierro Harvey observes the results from a Feb. 26 vote for the Traditional Plan, which affirms the church’s current bans on ordaining LGBTQ clergy and officiating at or hosting same-sex marriage. The vote came on the last day of the 2019 General Conference in St. Louis. Photo by Paul Jeffrey, UMNS.

Outcome of General Conference bittersweet

United Methodist traditionalists say General Conference vote was best way forward for denomination, but it probably means a split is coming.
General Conference
The Rev. Adam Hamilton speaks March 28 at the Perkins Theological School for the Laity, at Southern Methodist University’s Perkins School of Theology, in Dallas. His topic: “The Future of a Divided Church.” Photo by Sam Hodges, UMNS.

Denomination’s future under discussion — quietly

Conflict over homosexuality, unresolved by GC2019, prompts allies and opponents to talk afresh about options.
General Church
Messages of support for LGBTQ students cover the United Methodist cross and flame in a hallway at the Boston School of Theology after the special General Conference voted to affirm and strengthen the denomination’s rules against gay clergy and same-sex weddings. Photo by Anastasia Kidd, Boston School of Theology.

Seminary leaders stress inclusiveness after GC2019

Leaders of most U.S. United Methodist theological schools say the passing of the Traditional Plan won’t change their policies of inclusion.