Delegates vote to fund global education, Africa University

The growth of the United Methodist Church, which in 2003 touted a membership of more than 10 million, can be attributed, in part, to evangelism efforts in Africa, southeast Asia and Europe.

On May 6, General Conference delegates voted to provide schools in those regions and around the world with more resources to educate people doing the work of the church.

The delegates approved a $4 million Global Education Fund to assist the 748 Methodist schools, colleges, universities and seminaries in 69 nations.

The new fund will be part of the United Methodist Board of Higher Education and Ministry’s technical assistance program, which works to train “a new generation of clergy and lay leaders who will commit boldly to Jesus Christ and be characterized by intellectual excellence, moral and spiritual courage, and holiness of heart and life.”

Plans for the fund are based on the knowledge and experience gained by denominational leaders from Africa University in Mutare, Zimbabwe.

Africa University — a United Methodist-related school that Habitat for Humanity International founder Milton Fuller called “one of the great success stories of Christian mission stories in the world today” — received the funding it requested from the denomination.

Delegates voted to provide Africa University with $10 million in apportioned funds and an additional $10 million to be raised through World Service Special Gifts over the next four years. The apportioned figure is the same as that approved by the 2000 General Conference. The school serves 1,123 students from 22 African nations.

*Lauber is associate editor of the UMConnection, the newspaper of the United Methodist Church's Baltimore-Washington Annual Conference.

News media contact: (412) 325-6080 during General Conference, April 27-May 7.
After May 10: (615) 742-5470.

Related


Like what you're reading? Support the ministry of UM News! Your support ensures the latest denominational news, dynamic stories and informative articles will continue to connect our global community. Make a tax-deductible donation at ResourceUMC.org/GiveUMCom.

Sign up for our newsletter!

UMNEWS-SUBSCRIPTION
Social Concerns
The Rev. Jason Stubblefield. Photo courtesy of the author.

United Methodism's crisis of authority

United Methodists need the stability of established doctrine and the means to uphold it. Emulating the Catholic Church’s magisterium could serve that purpose.
Bishops
The Holston Conference’s Bishop Mary Virginia Taylor embraces the Rev. David Graves following his election as United Methodist bishop at the Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference in 2016. On April 30, the Council of Bishops affirmed its decision to delay electing any new leaders until after the postponed General Conference. File photo by Annette Spence, Holston Conference.

Bishops’ election plans draw mixed reaction

Many General Conference delegates praised the bishops for retracting an earlier recommendation of four-year hold on United Methodist elections. But some still have misgivings about a delay until 2022.
General Church
The three European central conferences of The United Methodist Church covering 32 countries and 10 time zones are making plans for a proposed denomination-wide split. Four bishops (clockwise from top left), Edward Khegay, Christian Alsted, Harald Rückert and Patrick Streiff, have drafted next steps should a separation plan win General Conference approval. Image courtesy of the bishops.

Europeans make plans for separation

Under a proposed separation plan, some European churchgoers expect to remain with The United Methodist Church while others join a new traditionalist denomination.