Civil Rights Act 50th Anniversary


Freedom Summer anniversary brings reflection

On July 2, 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The legislation outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin; unequal application of voter registration requirements; and racial segregation in schools, the workplace, and facilities that served the general public.

The signing and passage came in the midst of what was known as Freedom Summer, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee’s voter registration drive in Mississippi. That year, three Freedom Summer workers were murdered and acts of violence occurred in many places in the United States. At the same time, black and white Methodists and members of the Evangelical United Brethren Church were working alongside others to keep the efforts non-violent.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary, Interpreter Magazine invited six who were involved in the struggle for civil rights to share their reflections. 

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Daily digest - August 23, 2019

Filipino United Methodists condemn latest violence; Church rises from ashes of 2016 wildfire; Bishop tours struggling Illinois farms
Social Concerns
Norma P. Dollaga, a United Methodist deaconess, joined other religious groups during an Aug. 20, 2019, protest decrying the killings and violence on Negros Island. Filipino United Methodists have strongly condemned the bloodshed. Photo courtesy of Tetang Dollaga, UM News.

Filipino United Methodists condemn latest violence

State terrorism prevails on Negros Island, the Philippines Board of Church and Society said in condemning the latest killings.
Social Concerns
Anti-extradition demonstrators march to call for democratic reforms, in Hong Kong, China, July 21, 2019. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu.

As Hong Kong protests continue, so do prayers

Methodist resident says Christians reach out to both protesters and the government in a spirit of prayer.