Civil Rights Act 50th Anniversary


Freedom Summer anniversary brings reflection

On July 2, 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The legislation outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin; unequal application of voter registration requirements; and racial segregation in schools, the workplace, and facilities that served the general public.

The signing and passage came in the midst of what was known as Freedom Summer, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee’s voter registration drive in Mississippi. That year, three Freedom Summer workers were murdered and acts of violence occurred in many places in the United States. At the same time, black and white Methodists and members of the Evangelical United Brethren Church were working alongside others to keep the efforts non-violent.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary, Interpreter Magazine invited six who were involved in the struggle for civil rights to share their reflections. 

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Daily Digest - April 17, 2019

Centrists, progressives to discuss church's future; Creative spirit lifts Philippines' churches; Bishops discuss GC2019 at BMCR
General Church
The Rev. Jasmine Smothers, lead pastor of Atlanta First United Methodist Church, has been among the conveners of recent meetings by centrists and progressives to discuss the denomination's future. Photo by Les Scarbrough, Atlanta First United Methodist Church.

Centrists, progressives to discuss church's future

Unhappiness with General Conference 2019 prompts plan for big meeting, with dissolution and ‘gracious exit’ among the options.
General Church
A United Methodist deaf choir signs the words of a hymn during worship in the Baguio Area in northern Philippines. Across the country, an assessment team saw evidence of church vitality. Photo courtesy of the Standing Committee on Central Conference Matters.

Creative spirit lifts Philippines’ churches

A United Methodist team looked at whether the Philippines should have more bishops. The group’s report highlighted church strengths and needs.