Chicago’s Marcy-Newberry Association closes doors after 130 years

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CHICAGO — United Methodists in northern Illinois are grieving at the news that Marcy-Newberry Association Inc. is closing its doors after 130 years of providing crucial social services to the Chicago Near West, North Lawndale and Austin communities.  The association board took the action after an unsuccessful effort to raise much-needed funds to offset the growing deficit. All programming activities ended June 28, 2013. According to the agency’s press release, recent budget cuts, sequestration and reduced revenue from private funding sources have taken a toll.

“As United Methodists, we grieve at the loss of this long-standing ministry in Chicago’s communities. Our prayers are with the children and families, employees and staff of Marcy-Newberry,” said Chicago Episcopal leader, Bishop Sally Dyck. “Many churches volunteered, supported and gave to Marcy-Newberry over the years. We hope they will continue to support new or existing ministries critical for at-risk youth and children in our communities.”

Marcy-Newberry Association was established nearly 130 years ago by Evanston resident, Elizabeth Smith Marcy, who was active in her Methodist Church’s Woman’s Home Missionary Society. She saw the need to help those living in poverty within the Eastern European immigrant community on Chicago’s West Side.

Read the Northern Illinois Annual (regional) Conference report on Marcy-Newberry’s closing.


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