Bishop Carter recovering in Portland

Bishop Kenneth Carter continues to get physical therapy after undergoing surgery for a severed tendon May 12 at a Portland hospital. 

The Florida Conference episcopal leader fell in the plenary hall of General Conference here Tuesday, May 10, injuring his left knee badly enough that he required a wheelchair.

Carter said by email May 16 that the surgery was succesful. But he added that the nature of the injury made it impossible to be part of General Conference 2016, which runs through May 20 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland.

Carter said he's planning a return to Florida.

"The Carters are grateful for the prayers," he said. His wife, Pam, has been with him during the ordeal. 

Carter also shared that he's following the action at General Conference, which is livestreamed, and that he's grateful for the work of episcopal colleagues who have been presiding.

The accident occurred just before the official organization of the General Conference, the top legislative body of The United Methodist Church. Carter stumbled on steps leading to the raised area where bishops sit during plenary sessions.

Bishops Grant Hagiya and Robert Schnase were among those coming to his aid. 

Carter was treated at the Oregon Convention Center, a cold pack placed on his left knee. But he was clearly in acute pain, and unable to stand. On the advice of medical personnel, he agreed to be taken to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center.

Sam Hodges, a United Methodist News Service writer, lives in Dallas. Contact him at (615) 742-5470 or newsdesk@umcom.org

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